Roasted Rack of Lamb with Roasted Red Pepper Relish

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Roasted Rack of Lamb with Roasted Red Pepper Relish

*from Cook's Illustrated

Our grass-fed Katahdin lamb is well known for its mild flavor and for that reason, you don't need much seasoning when it comes to cooking lamb. The meat carries such excellent flavor, we hate to mask it too much behind heavy seasoning. Try out this simple recipe to enjoy a restaurant quality feast.

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Beef Kabobs

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Beef Kabobs

*from Simply Recipes

Here's a great tip for when you're cooking kabobs on the grill this summer - Using bamboo or wooden skewers instead of metal will help keep the steak from getting overcooked on the inside. Metal transfers heat, so is useful to use for chicken, or a meat that you want to cook all the way through, but not so useful for steak that you want done rare or medium rare.

 

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Creative New Hot Dog Toppings

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Creative New Hot Dog Toppings

*from Bon Appétit

What says summer and grilling season more than hotdogs sizzling over the fire? Our Double Z Uncured All Beef Franks are a great way to get the summer off the a great start. We are pretty proud of these franks, and sometimes, they deserve a little more than the traditional ketchup and mustard. Check out some of these spins on the summer time staple. 

 

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Butter-Basted Rib Eye Steaks

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Butter-Basted Rib Eye Steaks

*from Food & Wine Magazine

"This steak is based on a recipe from Alain Ducasse. Halfway through cooking, these bone-in rib eyes are basted with a mixture of butter, thyme and garlic, so they're crusty outside and richly flavored."

***If you are using grass-fed steaks, cooking times are often times shorter than with conventional steaks. Don't be afraid to use a meat thermometer to check the correct doneness of your steaks. Temperatures can be found on our cooking tips page, here.

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Sliders with a Grass-fed Twist

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Sliders with a Grass-fed Twist

*from Food Network, recipe by Ina Garten

Sliders are great cookout grub; easy to grab and simple to prepare, they will always win thumbs up. Try out this awesome recipe with some Double Z ground beef and you will not be disappointed!

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Perfect Porterhouse

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Perfect Porterhouse

*from Bon Appétit

"This is chef Bobby Flay's recipe for the perfect Porterhouse steak. With a steak this thick, you need to season liberally; when Flay demonstrated for us, the surface of the meat was virtually white from salt."

NOTE: This recipe does call for a 2" steak. Our Double Z porterhouse steak is cut to 1.5", so you may want to hold back on the salt a little compared to Bobby Flay. At least for the first time, until you get the hang of it.

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Fake Shack Burger

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Fake Shack Burger

*from Smitten Kitchen

This recipe is a great way to recreate a shack burger in your own kitchen. Click the arrow to link you over to the Smitten Kitchen page to read some great tips and information on the shack burger and the author's comments!

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A-1 Pot Roast Chuck Steak

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A-1 Pot Roast Chuck Steak

*from Food.com

"A great recipe for a chuck underblade steak that is usually inexpensive, but too often turns out tough. This one melts in your mouth and my family asks for it often. Good over mashed or small boiled potatoes, or rice.

 

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Lamb Burgers with Feta Cheese

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Lamb Burgers with Feta Cheese

*from NY Times Cooking

Mellow and mildly flavored, ground lamb contains lean meat and trimmings from the leg, loin, rib, shoulder, flank, neck, breast, or shanks. Readily available, it can be the main event or a substitute for ground beef in many recipes. Ground lamb offers a long list of possibilities for quick and easy weeknight dinners: meatballs, burgers and sliders, shepherd’s pie, kabobs, and meatloaf. If you want a taste of the Mediterranean, a lamb burger with feta is simple, delicious and healthy.

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Roast Leg of Lamb with Anchovy, Garlic, and Rosemary

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Roast Leg of Lamb with Anchovy, Garlic, and Rosemary

*from NY Times Cooking, by Aleksandra Crapanzano

Easter is just around the corner, and in many households, roasted lamb is on the menu. If you are looking for a fresh way to prepare your traditional leg of lamb, check out this recipe from the NY Times Cooking page. It is guaranteed to have your guests asking for seconds.

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Spicy, Garlicky Meatloaf

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Spicy, Garlicky Meatloaf

*from NY Times Cooking, by Melissa Clark

We all have that memory of eating meatloaf growing up. Whether that memory is good or not is another question, and likely a story for another time. Even so, check out this recipe and you'll notice it is not your traditional meatloaf. Some Double Z ground beef will punch up this meatloaf even more. Give it a try and tell us what you think!

"This meatloaf is as pungent and zesty as a meatball, but baked in that iconic, sliceable loaf form. A combination of chilies and sage add a spicy, earthy note, and a glaze of tomato paste and olive oil elevates a traditional dish away from its ketchup roots. The pine nuts are a visual cue: this is something a little different. And it tastes great the day after."

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Easy Roast Beef

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Easy Roast Beef

* from Spark Recipes

Lean and versatile, this recipe is the little black dress of your healthy recipe arsenal. Cook this roast on a Sunday and enjoy it throughout the week. We used no salt, just pepper for a truly flavorful roast.

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Irish Lamb Stew

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Irish Lamb Stew

"Hearty and traditional Irish lamb stew. It's best to refrigerate the stew overnight, and reheat it the next day for eating. This soup 'ages' well!"

This is a perfect dish with the Nor'easter rolling in and St. Patrick's Day coming up! This recipe is made to serve about 10 people, scale accordingly for smaller groups.

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Homemade Corned Beef

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Homemade Corned Beef

Corn comes from Old English and refers to a ‘grain’ of something, coarse salt for example. Corning is simply the brining of larger cuts of meat to give them added flavor, and to semi-preserve them for a longer time. Brisket is common, and consists of two cuts, ‘point’ and ‘flat’ but almost any large, tougher cut will do. The low, slow braise makes the meat deliciously tender. This recipe calls for pink salt, but can be corned without. If no pink salt is used, the color of the finished meat won’t be the characteristic pink of meats cured with nitrates.

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Garlicky, Smoky Grilled London Broil with Chipotle Chiles

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Garlicky, Smoky Grilled London Broil with Chipotle Chiles

*from NY Times Cooking, by Melissa Clark

"No matter if you broil, pan-sear or grill it, like most economical cuts, London broils want to stay rare and juicy and a little chewy to show off its best side. Cooked through until completely brown, these steaks toughen and dry up. Warning to well-done steak lovers: You might want to buy a different hunk of beef."

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Slow-Cooked Brisket and Onions

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Slow-Cooked Brisket and Onions

*from The Kitchn, by Faith Durand

"If you ask me about comfort food, I will answer promptly: slow-cooked brisket. This old-fashioned pot roast, cooked quietly in the slow cooker all day with just a handful of ingredients and a mess of caramelized onions, makes a rich broth and meat that melts in your mouth. Sunday dinner, weeknight supper — whenever you eat it, this is a classic dish both convenient and comforting."

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Slow-Cooked Short Ribs

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Slow-Cooked Short Ribs

*from Gordon Ramsay

How can you go wrong with beef, pancetta, and red wine? Gordon Ramsay takes these short ribs and turns them into a top notch meal with only a handful of steps. It seems too easy, but the proof is in the pudding...or short ribs, in this instance. Watch the short video in this post and try it yourself!

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Paleo Korean-style Short Ribs

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Paleo Korean-style Short Ribs

*from Nom Nom Paleo

"Inspired by a recipe in Slow Cooker Revolution from the editors at America’s Test Kitchen, I’ve made this Korean-style dish several times—and every time, it’s been easy-peasy and tasty. I simplified and Paleoized the recipe by subbing out the soy sauce with coconut aminos, the rice wine vinegar with coconut vinegar, and leaving out the tapioca. What’s cool about this recipe is that you don’t need to sear off any of the meat or carmelize any aromatics –- it’s pretty much a dump-it-in-and-forget-about-it kind of dish. That being said, when I do have the time I will char the short ribs under the broiler before throwing them in the slow cooker."

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Paleo Pot Roast

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Paleo Pot Roast

*from Stupid Easy Paleo

Here is an awesome paleo spin on a classic pot roast recipe. The exciting part of pot roast is the versatility of the meal - you can change the vegetables around to what you have in the cupboard or experiment with different spices (use small amounts to start!) in order to not get tired of the roast. 

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Slow Cooker Pot Roast

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Slow Cooker Pot Roast

*from The Daring Gourmet

"...let me stress one thing I learned from my mom about cooking roasts:  Probably THE single most important factor to the flavor of the finished roast is to fry it until it’s very browned on all sides before cooking it.  That is the KEY to a deliciously flavorful roast so whatever you do, don’t skip that step!  And don’t be afraid to get it good and browned.  Not only will it greatly enhance the flavor of the roast itself, but all those burnt bits on the bottom of the pan is what will give the gravy that irresistibly wonderful flavor.

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